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Modern Light Painting

written by: Jeffery Jay Luhn

Light painting is the common term for a technique that uses a single light, which is moved during the exposure, or through a series of exposures, to simulate a more complex lighting scheme. Most often, a small lamp is moved around to seem as though the shot was taken with a larger light source, or multiple sources. Back in the film era light painting was always fun, but often unpredictable unless extensive testing was done. Camera LCD review features and the ability to blend multiple exposures in Photoshop elevates this age-old technique from a technical chore to an adventure. For Read more »

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Making Your Photos Last

written by: Jeffery Jay Luhn

Is there a way to make your photos live for a century beyond your lifetime? What strategies can you pursue to motivate people to find, view and preserve your work? Creating important and accessible content is the first step in preserving your photographic legacy, but it may all be lost unless you build an enduring archive with both traditional and digital methods. My inspiration to archive and distribute photographs comes from the collections of Morton and Herbert Luhn, my grandfather and great uncle who started making personal photos and putting them into albums around 1907. By 1919 they had amassed Read more »

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Refining Your Style

Compelling Portraits Far From Home
written by: Jeffery Jay Luhn

Getting great travel portraits is an acquired skill, one that I’m still refining after more than 40 years as a commercial photographer. I’m happy to say that I’ve made more progress with it in the last 10 years than in the previous three decades. Much of the improvement has come from the ability to review photos on the LCD while I’m shooting, allowing me to refine the image during the session. In the old days I gave my exposed rolls to a courier at a foreign airport in exchange for another brick of film. I got my critiques over the Read more »

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Bare Bulb Technique

written by: Jeffery Jay Luhn

There was a time from about 1930 through 1958 when flashbulbs ruled the world of candid photography. Without the necessity for hot lights, cumbersome fixtures and long extension cables, almost anyone with a camera and a flash attachment could sell a photo. The rule of the day was, “F/8 and be there.” Newspaper and magazine photographers showed up at events and proudly announced that the subjects could “act naturally” because the flash would freeze the action. Publicity photographers swarmed to places where movie stars could be snapped as they passed by. Freelance photographers came out at night, overcoats bulging with flashbulbs, Read more »