Dubovoy_JF_2007_1

Surpass the Darkroom?

create prints that rival – and perhaps surpass – the darkroom
written by: Mark Dubovoy

I believe that this is the beginning of a new era in inkjet printing, one in which print quality is finally equaling, if not surpassing, that of traditional prints. Part of this increase in print quality is due to a recent generation of printers with corresponding new ink sets. Equally responsible, however, is the latest generation of fine-art papers offering unprecedented levels of Dmax and dynamic range. While you need to buy an updated printer to benefit from their increased quality, you can probably use the new papers with your existing printer, so I’m going to focus on the new Read more »

Dubovoy_SO_2008_1

Storage and Preservation of Digital Images

written by: Mark Dubovoy

Something momentous has happened with the development of digital photography: For the first time since photography was invented, we have the capability to preserve original images without any deterioration for extremely long periods of time. Perhaps forever. The negative in the shoebox Most PHOTO Techniques readers know that storing negatives or transparencies in a shoebox is a bad idea. These boxes usually are acidic, do nothing to control temperature and humidity, and can lead to damaging physical pressure from having the originals on top of each other. All of these factors lead to premature decay and damage to precious originals. Read more »

Dubovoy_JF_2008_1

The Battle of the Digital Giants

Do digital backs, combined with medium- or large-format cameras give you more than high-end (yet less expensive) DSLRs?
written by: Mark Dubovoy

Art is all about passion.Yet few forms of art engender as much passion as photography. Photographers are not only passionate about their work, they are almost obsessively passionate about their equipment and their methodology.This passion leads to heated discussions about many topics. One such topic is the use of DSLRs versus larger-format digital cameras.Therefore, I thought it would be very interesting to compare a top DSLR with a top medium-format digital outfit, as well as with a top digital view-camera system. The purpose of this article is not to test every single DSLR, every single lens, every view camera, and Read more »

Beautiful Skin Tones

A Quick and Effective Method
written by: Mark Dubovoy

I believe that almost every photographer has been confronted by a photograph of one or more people, shot either under unknown lighting conditions or mixed lighting. Meaning that either a white-balance card (or other device) was not used, or that the lighting might be a combination of two or more of the following: daylight, flash, fluorescent, or incandescent light. The camera is usually set to Auto White Balance and the final result is an image that is not properly color balanced. I have a quick method for dealing with this situation. Everything that follows also applies to film shooters, where Read more »

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Raw Conversion and Editing Software

The pluses and minuses of Aperture, Lightroom, and CaptureOne
written by: Mark Dubovoy

In my opinion, photographers should always shoot Raw— after all, if you don’t, you’re throwing away much of the information your camera captured. Unfortunately, there are literally hundreds of different Raw formats and dozens of Raw converters on the market. There also are a multitude of products that allow you to edit photographs out of Raw. Which should you use? Trying to compare them all would be a massive undertaking. Although most major manufacturers have their own Raw conversion/editing software, (and there are a number of small, independent companies with Raw conversion and/or editing products), three products currently dominate the market: Read more »

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Digital Image Capture Done Right

Your camera may be a computer (sort of), but that doesn't mean it's as smart as you are
written by: Mark Dubovoy

In recent years, image-capture devices such as cameras, lenses, and digital backs have continued to improve at a very fast pace. Post-capture software tools also have shown dramatic improvements. It appears to me that as a result of these two trends, more and more photographers are becoming lazy, developing a laissez faire attitude about the capture process. There is a tendency to set the camera to autofocus, auto exposure, auto-image stabilization, auto everything, and just point and release the shutter. I constantly hear that no matter what the problem is with the original capture, it can always be fixed later in Read more »

mark dubovoy, photo technique, file storage

Storage and Preservation of Digital Images

PHOTO Techniques, Sept/Oct 2008
written by: Mark Dubovoy

Something momentous has happened with the development of digital photography: For the first time since photography was invented, we have the capability to preserve original images without any deterioration for extremely long periods of time. Perhaps forever. The negative in the shoebox Most PHOTO Techniques readers know that storing negatives or transparencies in a shoebox is a bad idea. These boxes usually are acidic, do nothing to control temperature and humidity, and can lead to damaging physical pressure from having the originals on top of each other. All of these factors lead to premature decay and damage to precious originals. Read more »

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Antarctica: A Voyage to the Bottom of the Earth

written by: Mark Dubovoy

A writer and critic for the New York Times once told me that every landscape picture worth taking had already been taken. He also claimed that landscape photographers continued in a futile quest to get farther and farther away, to more difficult and inaccessible places, only to return with images that looked basically the same as prior work. I could not disagree more with both statements. I personally feel that any notion that all landscape images worth capturing have already been captured is absolutely preposterous. I am also a strong believer that in spite of the gross overpopulation and pollution Read more »