Edberg_SO_2007_2

Evaluate Prints under the Right Lights

The wrong illumination throws off all your color decisions
written by: Timothy Edberg

Creating a color print involves making trial prints and adjusting color and density for your next attempt. This is as true for digital printing as for darkroom printing—digital profiles and color management only take you so far, and then it’s adjustment by visual inspection. But are you examining your trial prints under the right illumination? The nature of the illumination can alter the appearance of colors, so using a poor viewing light can lead to poor choices. The illumination affects the look of the print because we view color by the light it reflects. A lemon looks yellow because it Read more »

Edberg_JF_2007_1

Measuring Digital Dynamic Range

Knowing your camera's range helps you make crucial exposure decisions
written by: Timothy Edberg

Do you know the dynamic range of your digital camera—the tonal range of lights to darks it can usefully capture? It can guide the way you shoot; the smaller the dynamic range (DR), the more careful you must be that exposures don’t blow out highlights or fill in shadows. I’ve heard “experts” make conflicting blanket claims of anywhere from a four-stop to 12-stop DR for digital cameras, and manufacturer’s specs might be marketing hype—so why not just measure your DR for yourself? It’s easy to do; I’ll show you how. In the process you’ll learn at what exposure highlights saturate Read more »

timothyedberg

Evaluate Prints Under the Right Lights

PHOTO Techniques, Sept/Oct 2007
written by: Timothy Edberg

Creating a color print involves making trial prints and adjusting color and density for your next attempt. This is as true for digital printing as for darkroom printing—digital profiles and color management only take you so far, and then it’s adjustment by visual inspection. But are you examining your trial prints under the right illumination? The nature of the illumination can alter the appearance of colors, so using a poor viewing light can lead to poor choices. The illumination affects the look of the print because we view color by the light it reflects. A lemon looks yellow because it Read more »